Courses

Studies of particular themes, issues, and topics of special interest pertaining to Latin American history. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

Studies of particular themes, issues, and topics of special interest pertaining to American History. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

Studies of particular themes, issues, and topics of special interest pertaining to World History. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

Studies of particular themes, issues, and topics of special interest pertaining to Asian and Pacific History. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

An exploration of the origins and development of 20th century ideas, institutions, and systems in global perspective. Forces that have united and divided the contemporary world community are examined: imperialism, science, democracy, communism, nationalism, militarism, racism, cultural traditionalism, and technological disparities. Satisfies upper-division GE Area D2 (World History and Civilization).

A study of the Black Sea region in the early-modern and modern eras. Major themes include Russian expansion into the Pontic-Caspian Steppe, the Crimean Khanate, the incorporation of Georgia and Crimea into the Russian Empire, the fall of the Ottoman Empire and the formation of modern Turkey , Balkan nationalism, and secessionist wars in the Caucasus and Ukraine

A study of the Mediterranean region in the early modern era. The course considers economic, political, social, and cultural interaction in the region. Topics covered include the Ottoman Empire, Iberian expansion into North Africa, the Spanish reconquista, and naval warfare and piracy. History majors may consider this an upper-division European history elective.

Focusing on the development of institutions and spread of movements that connected Western Africa, Northern Europe, North America, the Caribbean, and South America in a transatlantic context from 1500-1800, this course considers the topics of state formation, revolutions, empire, migration, religion, economy, race, class and gender in an Atlantic framework. Although the course emphasizes the early modern period, additional consideration is given to the issues facing the Atlantic community in the modern era.

A comparative study of empires and their colonies throughout history. Problems in colonial history, decolonization and the writing of imperial history are considered.

An examination of various philosophies and methodologies that have shaped historiography. Consideration is given to the relationship between the historian and the climate of opinion, to varying interpretations of historical events, to the place of history as a literary art, and to the techniques of historical research and writing.

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