Courses

An inquiry into the indigenous cultures of Central and South America and an examination of Spanish, Portuguese, and other European empires in America. Areas of study may include land, labor, religion, culture, slavery, race, gender, trade and economic development, art and literature, and resistance and revolt.

A study of the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Latin America since independence, with an emphasis on political movements in the 20th century, including revolutions in Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, and Nicaragua; socialism in Chile, peronismo in Argentina; and modernization in Brazil. The role of the United States in Latin America and modern Latin American art and literature will also be emphasized.

This course (originates in WGS) will take an activist-historical perspective on the history of American women. We will study historical figures, events, and movements central to the history of feminist activism for equality and social justice. The class will address the politics of writing women into history and documenting the diversity of women's activism. Cross-listed as WGS 365.

The course introduces students to the complexities of race and ethnicity in Latin America. By tracing Latin American historical developments from colonialism through the 21st century, students explore the debates of what the nation is and who its citizens are. Students examine how Arabs, Jews, Japanese, Chinese, Blacks, and the indigenous peoples have positioned themselves in Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Bolivia, Cuba, Mexico, Honduras, Colombia, and Haiti. As these Latin American countries struggle with political instability, as well as economic and social inequality, racial and ethnic questions have become increasingly important in these pluralistic and multiethnic societies.

Studies of particular themes, issues, and topics of special interest to general students as well as to majors. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

An introduction to the major ideas, values, and beliefs operative in American history up to the Civil War. Topics include Puritan religion and culture, the revolutionary and constitutional debates, Transcendentalism, and slavery controversies.

An introduction to the major ideas, values, and beliefs operative in American history from the Civil War to the turn of the 21st century. Topics include the Social Gospel, pragmatism, socialism, the New Left, feminism, and conservative thought.

This course examines warfare in modern American history, using the methods of oral history. After reading oral history interviews relating to American military history, the class conducts original interviews and translates those interviews into a performance for the campus community.

A semester lecture series on a specific theme or topic presented by members of the department, other SSU faculty, and guest speakers. May be audited. Open to the public. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

Studies of particular themes, issues, and topics of special interest pertaining to European History. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

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