Courses

Challenge Examination - The state code requirement in world or U.S. history may be satisfied by passing the department's challenge examination. (Dates and times are published at the beginning of each semester.)

An introduction to the early, classical, and medieval civilizations that have most influenced the modern world. Developments (from prehistory to 1500 C.E.) include the Eastern traditions of India, China, and Japan; the world of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; the classical Mediterranean civilizations; tropical Africa; and the medieval and Renaissance cultures of the emerging West. Required of all history majors. Satisfies GE Area D2 (World History and Civilization).

An introduction to modern and contemporary history from 1500 C.E. to the present. Course material includes the impact of world expansion on the Americas, Africa and Asia; the growth of nationalism and the national state; industrial, political, and social revolutions worldwide; the wars of the 20th century; and decolonization and the conclusion of the Cold War. Required of all history majors. Satisfies GE Area D2 (World History and Civilization).

A comparison of the English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in America, from the conquest to independence. Topics include: Native Americans, European background, colonial government, religion, economic policies, social relations, slavery, art and literature, independence movements, and nation building. Satisfies GE Area D3.

A comparison of the development of the United States after independence with that of Latin America. Topics include: colonial legacies, political leadership, expansion and conflict, regionalism, economic development, reform and revolution, church and state, race relations, education, and inter-American relations. Satisfies GE Area D3.

A general survey of the major developments in U.S. history from the European discovery and colonization of the Western Hemisphere through Reconstruction. Required of all history majors. Satisfies GE Area D3 (U.S. History), and the state code requirement in history.

A general survey of the major developments in U.S. history from the end of Reconstruction to the present day. Satisfies GE Area D3 (U.S. History) and the state code requirement in history.

This course will examine warfare in the ancient and medieval Near East, Mediterranean, and European worlds. Particular emphases will be placed on the development of new military technologies and strategies and their social, economic, and political ramifications. The class will also investigate the consequences of war and its impact on non-combatants.

This course is designed to introduce students to the intellectual, political, social and economic traditions that helped make the 16th century Chinese state the greatest bureaucratic empire in the world. From the great intellectual efflorescence of the "100 School" period to the far-ranging ocean voyages of the eunuch admiral Zheng He, the course will examine a broad spectrum of topics, including folk religion, gender roles, imperial politics, medicine, art, and literature, among others. The relationship between social, economic, and political developments will be emphasized.

This course is designed to introduce students to the intellectual, political, social, and economic traditions that underlay the creation of the Japanese emperor system and the rise of warrior government. From the unique aristocratic culture of Heian Japan to the legendary conquests of Hideyoshi, the course will look at a broad range of topics, including religion, gender, politics, art, and philosophy. The course also examines the influence on Japan of Tang China and early modern Europe. The emphasis will be on the relationship between social, economic, political, and cultural forces.

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